Review: The Case for Christ Soars Above Its Genre Predecessors

I just got back from seeing the brand new Christian movie, The Case for Christ, based on Lee Strobel’s apologetics classic of the same name. What the verdict? It’s an amazing film. 

Let me preface my review with this— I am Christian that strongly dislikes 99% of the Christian films being released today. Films like God’s Not Dead, though their motivations are noble, because the filmmakers don’t care about quality or strong writing because they know the Christian audience will eat it up anyway. That’s a discussion for another time, though. The point is— I am a critic of modern Christian filmmaking. So, when I heard Lee Strobel speak at my church, saying there were no cringey moments in this film, I rolled my eyes. The plot twist here? He wasn’t lying. 

The Case for Christ, directed by Jon Gunn, succeeds where its aplogetics film predecessors like the God’s Not Dead films failed— it’s legitimately good and well-written. I was floored by how well-made it actually was. While God’s Not Dead is practically a cringe-fest with poor writing and a shameless ad for the Newsboys, The Case for Christ tries a little something unconvential— it tries to be good. Even the cinematography here looks like they put serious thought behind it— it looks, really, really good. 

Where else does the film succeed where its Pure Flix predecessor failed? It’s accessible. Whereas God’s Not Dead depicted athiests as one-dimensional hate mongers with no conscience or emotions, The Case for Christ offers a compelling (and true) tale of an investigative journalist searching for evidence to disprove God’s existence to his wife, while also unwraveling a strange mystery about a cop that got shot. Throughout the film, we see Lee’s shortcomings, but we also see something we never saw from G.N.D.’s antagonistic Professor Rattison— humanity and emotion outside of anger. The evidence is also depicted in a compelling and believable way that doesn’t come off as a sermon. It’s very organic and well-written.

The verdict? Watch the film. It’s incredibly well-done, and shows what Christian cinema could be— that is, good. 

Verdict: 9.5/10

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