Why Spider-Man: Homecoming Ultimately Falls Flat (Mild Spoiler Warning)

Spider-Man: Homecoming was… well, it was a movie. Why do I dislike it so much? And why are we still talking about Spider-Man 2?

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After the dud that was the duo of The Amazing Spider-Man films, we now have Sony’s attempt to turn everything around, this time with a reboot film deeply entrenched in the MCU— Spider-Man: Homecoming. Before I get into the what I didn’t like about the movie, I’ll tell you what I liked. 

First of all, Tom Holland is a great Spider-Man. He plays the character very well, including the character’s awkwardness and quippy nature. Secondly, I liked the Vulture. While not really given much to do, Michael Keaton is another high point of this film. The characterization of Peter’s best friend, Ned, is also very likable. The costume was great, and while I’m mixed on the idea of Peter being given the suit and it making him into a more tech-based Iron Man-lite, I also liked the banter between Peter and Karen (or “suit lady,” the A.I. in the Spider-Man suit). 

Now the bad. This movie has a few glaring issues aside from the bigger problem. Firstly, the incessant swearing. Like seriously, it never stops. It wasn’t funny, and instead was jarring and took me out of the film. Secondly, the characterization. I know I previously praised the characterization of Spider-Man, which I still hold to, but there’s a big problem with it. Peter in the comics has always been a loner, and he’s been independent— he was smart and quick on his feet, not needing the help of Tony Stark’s fancy gadgets to get him out of a pickle. I missed that aspect of Peter’s character— the independent genius. I understand why they made Iron Man a fixture in this film (to further establish Spidey in the MCU), and I’m happy he’s in a bigger pen of characters to play with, but something just felt… missing in his interactions with Iron Man. Which leads into the film’s biggest and most glaring issue…

It completely lacks any substance. While I still have problems with Sam Raimi’s first two Spider-Man movies (the ones with Tobey Maguire), the reason they’re still held in high esteem to this day is that they have great depth. Spider-Man 2 especially. They have a greater theme, and they have something to say about that greater theme. Homecoming doesn’t really have a theme. It doesn’t set out to say something meaningful, it sets out to be successful movie that sets up a franchise. It also tries to be a comedy, and while most of the jokes are funny, it just felt… flat. 

I don’t have anything against comedy in superhero movies— earlier this year, I saw Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I laughed at its jokes, but I enjoyed it more because of its deeper themes of family and fatherhood. That made it memorable, and gave it something aside from the comedy aspect. 

Did I like Homecoming? Well… I thought it was just fine. It was a fine, perfectly forgettable superhero flick that fits well with the summer blockbuster fare. Do I ever want to see it again? No. Do I wish the movie would cut down on the foul language, franchise set-up, and lack of substance? Yes. Does Sony as a film studio need to get its crud together? Absolutely.

What’d you think of Spider-Man: Homecoming? Comment below! I wanna hear your thoughts on this.

No Spoilers Review: War for the Planet of the Apes Absolutely Blew Me Out of the Water

As someone who’s barely even heard of the franchise, what’d I think of its final chapter?

Before the review, first a little backstory. 

Yesterday, on a whim at 3:28, my brother and decided to go see a 3:30 showing of War for the Planet of the Apes. Luckily, we were standing right outside the movie theater, so we bought our tickets and headed in. The problem? We’d never even seen (and barely even heard of) the previous two films in the trilogy. I’d seen the trailers and heard the buzz, so I was intrigued. 

We plopped down in our plastic-y AMC movie theater seats and sat through 20 minutes of uninteresting, unmemorable trailers. Finally, the movie began, and from that opening minute to the final minute of its over two-hour run time, my brother and I were enthralled. A lot of these characters we didn’t even know the names of, yet we reacted viscerally and deeply when they struggled. The beautiful soundtrack played softly in the background throughout the film, enhancing the movie’s scenes. The special effects were fantastic, and language was nonexistent until the film’s last fourty minutes or so. To add on to all that, the acting was phenomenal.

When the credits rolled, I got up from my theater seat in shock. Literally. As I walked out of the theater, I had no idea what to say. As my brother and I met our parents outside to eat dinner at the mall, I had no idea how to describe the experience I’d just been through. I’d fallen in love with a bunch of characters I’d never met before as their story reached a gripping climax. 

Do I recommend the film? Highly. Not for younger kids, definitely, due to the high-stakes and intensity, but teens and adults will do fine. Violence never becomes gratuitous, but the film does have quite a few battle scenes. 

Score: 9.5/10